Transferable Skills Of A Stay-At-Home Dad

Being a parent isn’t easy. It requires you to work 365 days a year. With no holidays, no sick days and zero salaries. There’s no training scheme to teach you how to do it. There’s no appraisal or reward system to let you know whether you’re doing a good job or not. You’re just expected to get on with it and hope you’re not going to completely mess it up.

Yet, despite the massive amounts of pressure, responsibility and hard work that goes into it, it can be the most rewarding job you’ll ever have.

It’s also the most varied job I’ve ever had and this got me thinking. If you left your job completely so you could be at home and raise your children, what do people actually do when they want to go back into the ‘workplace’ after being at home with their children for so long? I know if I wanted to go back to work and change fields now my CV would look very sparse, or would it?

Surely the skills that I have acquired from looking after my two girls all day, every day for the last 3 years are transferable into other areas too? Being around two children under the age of four and having to deal with their trails and tribulation surely qualifies me in all manner of professions in today’s world, don’t you think? I must have learnt something.

Here are some of the jobs I have as a stay-at-home parent that I think would be perfectly transferable into the working world. Mums, you will probably recognise most of these too.

GP, Surgeon and therapist.

Personal shopper, dresser and stylist.

Bodyguard and security.

Judge.

Activity organiser, event coordinator and party planner.

Photographer and Detective.

Monster killer and General superhero.

Investment banker, accountant and finance manager.

A caretaker and dog walker.

Cook, cleaner and dishwasher.

Personal assistant, chauffeur.

Bodyguard, security and referee.

Household CEO.

So these are the many jobs I have as a stay-at-home parent that are completely transferable will help me build up my CV and make me far more attractive to any potential employer.

I often think about the future and returning to ‘paid work’ and if I’m being honest, it fills me dread but after writing this post it’s quite clear that my feelings are unfounded. I seemed to have learnt a lot from being a stay-at-home dad without even realising it.

What do you think? Did I miss any? Let me know in the comments below.

6 thoughts on “Transferable Skills Of A Stay-At-Home Dad

Add yours

  1. So true, in our house the jobs Cleaner and Judge are my most prominent roles. I work as a blogger and do market research outside the house to fit in around the kids. It is so true about transferable skills, I just wonder if employers will ever recognise that.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s called being a parent, jobs you would never of thought you would have to do great read mate Thank you for linking to #Thatfridaylinky please come back next week

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Amen! Have been a SAHM for 8.5yrs, 4 kids, and now just starting to return to work. Have all the stuff you mentioned above on my ‘CV’ plus a decent amount of voluntary stuff I’ve been able to do while I’ve been at home (running toddler groups, school governor, church involvement etc). But actually my experience has been a bit different…I always thought I’d be returning to what I left (teaching)…in actual fact, things have changed quite a bit since becoming a mum, and I now find myself becoming a freelance writer!?! I only started writing once I had two kids…it would never have happened had I not had that stay at home period. Good luck to you for all the future holds.

    Liked by 2 people

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